Thursday, September 24, 2009

Number Of Americans Who Believe In Higher Power But Have No Religious Affiliation Grows

It's not surprising to me that surveys show that the number of Americans who believe in a higher power but are rejecting organized religions has grown. I personally am amongst that group. I've had it with organized religion long ago. I don't think I need to go into a litany of reasons. All I would offer is look around and you'll find that most of the conflict in the world in this day and age is rooted in fanatic or near fanatic organized religious dogma. I'm not just referring to Muslim extremists in some far away cave, but also to the American Christian Right, who also reject reason and fact, and helped indirectly to promote war in places like Iraq.

Hopefully I'm not throwing the baby out with the bath water. I also would add a caveat to the observation in that many organized religions provide hope and help to many who are in need. Both in a spiritual and corporal way. But quite often in my opinion organized religions involve themselves in areas of life in which they have no business, i.e. politics. They are so involved in converting people to their dogmatic causes and congregations that they fall into the thinking and trickery of thinking that their truth should be sold as the one and only truth or the only path to salvation.

The belief in Deism , which this new spiritual thinking is associated with is not new, but the interesting aspect is that it was thought to have been something that had enjoyed its peak in popularity long ago. In fact it was popular belief system with Thomas Jefferson and the founding fathers of this county. Apparently this new group of people, known as "nones", is growing. It's currently estimated to represent about 15% of the US population. If true it represents a group that is larger then most of the major denominations of the well known American organized religions.

1 comment:

  1. Anonymous8:14 AM

    Radical Agnostic-I don't know and neither do you!

    ReplyDelete